Dear anonymous lady, where is your evidence?

This is a response to the lady who left a message on my council telephone voicemail. I would have called her back except that she left no name or number.

She called regarding my article in the press regarding the homeless; she said that they were not very nice people, and that Milton ward had suffered a crime wave since they had set up tents on the Cliffs.

I really do not know how many of the rough sleepers she had actually met, but describing them all as not very nice leads down a particularly nasty road. Judge individuals not whole groups of people.

It is also some stretch to link to unrelated incidents without any evidence. A crime wave in Milton (a ward that sees enough crime without the presence of rough sleepers) can be ascribed to any number of reasons unless you, like me, prefer the rigour of evidence-based analysis.

I could also point out that the Cliffs have had rough-sleepers encamped within its environs for more than a year – it is just that the latest lot are more visible.

Lady, if you have evidence that links crime to anyone then it is your civic duty to report this to the police. Otherwise I suggest you keep your irrational prejudices to yourself.

Of course I want the problem solved, but let’s tackle this with compassion and empathy for those without a roof of their own.

Our correspondent in Shanty Town

007I first came across the derelict garages described as a ‘shanty town’ a month or two back. I was out with some councillors and a council officer looking at fly-tipping and dumping problems. I took them down one alley that I knew was normally full of rubbish, then wandered off down another when I came across a part of Milton ward that I had not previously encountered. This was an area, flanked by housing, that contained garages that had clearly not been used to house cars for some time. I could immediately see that some of the garages had been in use, a view substantiated by a resident who told me that it was frequented by the homeless and drug users.

Because this site has been in the local newspapers this week I decided to revisit. I was going to take photographs and do some investigating. I expected a flying visit – I stayed an hour and a half.

I parked up in the Ceylon Road car park and made my way round to the alley that runs along behind the shops and flats between Ceylon Road and Hamlet Court Road. This alley, often strewn with all sorts of rubbish seemed especially blighted this morning. I wandered into the area where there were something like twenty garages, roughly two sets of ten facing each other. Some were in a very bad way, with caved in roofs and all sorts of detritus in them.

Whilst taking a look around I spotted someone in a garage. Crouching to make myself visible under the half-closed garage door I introduced myself to the gentleman who had evidently made this his home, and asked whether I could come in for a chat.

Mr A appeared to be in his early 40s. He told me he had been homeless since February 4th, when he was evicted from his Eastwood flat. He had had a short stay with HARP, and had recently been on the Cliffs, leaving because it was quite cold there. He wanted accommodation. Mr A told me that there were six staying in these garages.

Mr B would like an address – a common theme as the morning went on. He was not able to claim benefits as he had no address (not true for all of the rough sleepers here), and had to beg to get any money. Mr B had been homeless for 19 years.

Mr C had been thrown out of HARP for not engaging. I did question why he had not engaged; he suggested that he had somewhat misunderstood what was required of him, and also said that the rules were too rigid.

Mr D, a 44 year-old, He confessed to having drug issues, and like a number of those here had spent some time in prison. He was another who had spent years on the street.

Ms E, another 44 year old, wanted a roof over her head. She had been homeless for about a year, previously leading a settled life. She was clearly not well, had not eaten much recently, and I suggested that she must see a doctor.

Mr F was another critical of HARP. Mr G, a 33 year old ex-window fitter with young children that he was not seeing regularly explained the vicious circle that was the norm for rough sleepers trying to find work – no home no job, no job no home.

Mr H, at 30, was the youngest I met today. He had been homeless for 3 months since his release from prison. He needed a roof over his head.

Some general themes: Aside from one, a schizophrenic who suffered from claustrophobia, all wanted accommodation. Yet, even the schizophrenic wanted an address – somewhere to leave stuff, etc. His requirements were for a small space to call his own.

There was some criticism of HARP. I attend their trustees meetings (as the Council’s representative) and I have nothing but praise for the organisation, but my opinion was did not entirely tally with those I spoke to today. However, there seemed to be recognition that HARP, in general, were doing a good job.

“They set you up to fail” was what one said of HARP, complaining of too many rules. Another said they were too “black and white” – not enough “grey” with them rules.

“Always worrying about what to eat. How you are going to get food, how you are going to get drinks.” “No address often means no help. Can’t get a place because you can’t get a deposit.”

One guy owed Southend-on-Sea Borough Council £720, and they would not house him because of this debt (says he).

“Drugs numb the pain” said another. I heard stories about rough sleepers being beaten up, kicked, and set on fire.

“Spoke to Family Mosaic yesterday, hopefully they can help.”

A few had mobile phones. I heard how some charged these. It seems you learn a few tricks on the streets.

I was thanked for coming and listening. They were all polite, all very erudite. They need help, but also recognised that (some at least) had made mistakes. Many had seen prison, some were re-offending owing to the need to eat. Many were keen to assure me that the rubbish thereabouts was not their fault – and I can attest to the area being a dumping ground long before the latest batch of rough sleepers had set up home here.

Many had arrived in the last week, although I think it has been used by some for up to a month.

I ended my visit by breaking one of my own rules of not giving in to begging. It was impossible ignoring a request for some money for a drink. I have so much compared to these people.

There is clearly camaraderie amongst those homeless. They do care about having no proper home, not being able to wash, have a toilet, cook, or a place to keep things. They do worry about a lack of regular income. They have problems, and need help. They were happy to talk, and polite. I was pleased I went, pleased to have chatted with them, and hope that in some small way I can make their lives better.


Milton has very few council homes, and not much more social housing – and this despite the ward having about 50% of its homes available for rent.

As a socialist I would expect to prefer council housing to be run in-house; this is the standard ideological position for someone with my beliefs. However, from what I hear from comrades who regularly deal with the ALMO, and who also dealt with council housing issues when it was run in-house, it would seem that dealing with Southend-on-Sea’s council homes at arm’s length is working.

Politics is the art of the possible. It is good politics to accept that the outcome for Southend-on-Sea’s council tenants is better with South Essex Homes than with what existed beforehand. It is therefore welcome news that the Council (is) set to extend South Essex Homes contract. Should I be told that council tenants are losing out because of the existence of SEH then I will gladly push for its termination.

It is public knowledge (declared as an interest at many council meetings) that I have a daughter who works for South Essex Homes. However, my support for SEH (always subject to scrutiny and revision) has nothing to do this, and her employment would likely persist if it ever came back in-house.

I was probably the only guy on the beach in a suit today

Some of the Warrior Soup Kitchen people

Some of the Warrior Soup Kitchen people

I realise this makes me sound hopelessly square, but in my defence I did have earlier engagements which I thought required a reasonably tidy appearance.

This afternoon I popped down to the seafront (in a suit) to attend the Warrior Soup Kitchen Tent Awareness Day For Our Towns Homeless. It was my chance to talk to some volunteers about what they are up to, and why they are particularly drawn to help to homeless.

I have stated my desire to do what I can, which really amounts to helping raise awareness. It seems pretty feeble besides what I see others do, but we all can help in own small ways. (This is my widow’s groat.)

It is a fact, a shocking fact, that whilst we live in the sixth or seventh largest and wealthiest economy in the world, twenty-first century Britain has a growing poverty problem. Something like a million people a year visit food banks, and homelessness is rising.

I met many wonderful people today (Peter, Julie, Jo, Caren, Sam and Bernie, to name just a few). I also bumped into two Green Parliamentary candidates (Simon Cross and Sarah Yapp) and we had a good political chat, on the beach, in the blazing sun, with me in the suit.

The Facebook page for today’s event explains what it is about.

I picked this up this afternoon


The land behind the Bradbury Centre and what HARP want to do with it


Just called this in …

APPLN. NO: 15/01070/DOV
Ward. Milton
Officer: Amanda Rogers
Date Valid. 26 June 2015



I think we have to insist on the affordable housing element; in my opinion there is a desperate need for this across the borough.


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