Blenheim Park Ward inTouch Issue 7

CourtenayP1Issue 7. Of what? Is that the number of newsletters put out by Cllr James Courtenay since his election in 2011? Whatever, I am pleased that he is communicating with his residents – which is more than can be said for Blenheim Park’s newest councillor.

In comparison to what some of his compatriots have putting through letterboxes recently this is a wonderfully erudite A4 sheet. However, this is faint praise in reality, and like his colleagues James seems to struggle to have anything of substance to say since being consigned to opposition in the council chamber.

James’ piece on Europe is a good example of him appearing to wanting to tackle an important subject. Maybe he struggled to condense his views into the small amount of space he allocated to this subject, but it does come across as somewhat muddled. I think James wants to be on both sides of the debate over Europe – a position not unique amongst Conservatives. I think this is the root of their troubles, and why they are leaking support to Europe. Arguing for a referendum neatly avoids a commitment to the EU.

Cllr Courtenay also addresses changes to community policing. He writes: Essex Police, like the rest of the public sector, has been going through some changes, primarily to save money. Aside from his curious use of commas, he is being somewhat disingenuous; the public sector is under sustained attack from a Government intent on shrinking services for ideological reasons. Policing has been hit, and it leaves me with difficult conversations with residents who want to feel safe, yet see police stations closing, fewer police on the frontline, and now community meetings trimmed.

I recommend everyone to subscribe to Cllr Courtenay’s E-newsletter. I am sure that should one ever materialise it will be a marvellous read; or perhaps not.

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One Response to Blenheim Park Ward inTouch Issue 7

  1. This seems to be extreme nit-picking here… three punctuation marks are required where I have placed the commas. What would you suggest instead?

    But, as you started it, you also have a ‘curious use of commas’ as in, for example:

    “However, this is faint praise in reality, and like his colleagues James seems to struggle to have anything of substance to say since being consigned to opposition in the council chamber.”

    Where are the commas around ‘like his colleagues’?

    People in glass houses, Julian 🙂

    Still, if all we can find is punctuation errors in each other’s prose, I suspect we are both in the top quartile of our Parties’ literature!

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